Publications

In addition to the NACLA Report on the Americas, NACLA publishes books, anthologies and pamphlets for classroom and activist use. Some of our most important historic publications include Who Rules Columbia? (1968), the NACLA Research Methodology Guide (1970), and the Incredible Rocky series of comic books (1973). We hope to have more of these publications available online in the future.

Recent publications include:

Dispatches from Latin America: On the Frontlines Against Neoliberalism
Edited by Vijay Prashad and Teo Ballvé
South End Press

From the laboratory of neoliberalism—popularly known as “globalization”—Latin America has transformed itself into a launching pad for resistance. In Dispatches from Latin America, 28 authors report on countries from Mexico to Argentina to map the contemporary political and social territory. Drawn from the pages of the well-respected NACLA Report, this collection offers a riveting series of accounts that bring new insight into the region’s struggles and victories.
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Dispatches from Latin America: On the Frontlines Against Neoliberalism Dispatches from Latin America: On the Frontlines Against Neoliberalism

Latin America after Neoliberalism: Turning the Tide in the 21st Century?
Edited by Eric Hershberg and Fred Rosen
The New Press

Beginning in the 1980s, Latin America became a laboratory for the ideas and policies of neoliberalism. Now the region is an epicenter of dissent from neoliberal ideas and resistance to U.S. economic and political dominance; Latin America’s political map is being redrawn. Published in conjunction with The New Press, Latin America After Neoliberalism attempts to make sense of the ongoing upheavals throughout the continent as it moves into the vanguard of an international rejection of neoliberalism for a new and viable progressive alternative.
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Latin America After Neoliberalism: Turning the Tide in the 21st Century? Latin America After Neoliberalism: Turning the Tide in the 21st Century?

We also feature books published by NACLA Board of Directors and Editorial Committee members. Here are some highlights:

Empire and Dissent: The United States and Latin America
Edited by Fred Rosen
Duke University Press

Since the early nineteenth century, the United States has repeatedly intervened in the affairs of Latin American nations to pursue its own interests and to “protect” those countries from other imperial powers or from internal “threats.” The resentment and opposition generated by the encroachment of U.S. power has been evident in the recurrent attempts of Latin American nations to pull away from U.S. dominance and in the frequent appearance of popular discontent and unrest directed against imperialist U.S. policies. In Empire and Dissent, senior Latin Americanists explore the interplay between various dimensions of imperial power and the resulting dissent and resistance.
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Empire and Dissent: The United States and Latin America Empire and Dissent: The United States and Latin America

The World of Mexican Migrants: The Rock and the Hard Place
By Judith Adler Hellman
The New Press

The World of Mexican Migrants looks at the aftereffects of the radical economic and political shifts of Mexico in the 1990s through the eyes of those who, no longer able to eke out even a modest living in their homeland, have come to the United States.Drawing on five years of in-depth interviews, Hellman offers a much-needed humanizing perspective on the estimated 6 million undocumented Mexican migrants living in the United States, people whose voices are rarely heard in the din of angry political debate and talk-radio rhetoric on immigration.
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The World of Mexican Migrants: The Rock and the Hard Place The World of Mexican Migrants: The Rock and the Hard Place

Empire's Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism
By Greg Grandin
Metropolitan Books

A brilliant excavation of a long-obscured history, Empire's Workshop is the first book to show how Latin America has functioned as a laboratory for American extraterritorial rule. Historian Greg Grandin follows the United States' imperial operations, from Thomas Jefferson's aspirations for an "empire of liberty" in Cuba and Spanish Florida, to Ronald Reagan's support for brutally oppressive but U.S.-friendly regimes in Central America. He traces the origins of Bush's policies to Latin America, where many of the administration's leading lights -- John Negroponte, Elliott Abrams, Otto Reich -- first embraced the deployment of military power to advance free-market economics and first enlisted the evangelical movement in support of their ventures.
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Empire's Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism Empire's Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism

Being Indian in Hueyapan: A Revised and Updated Edition
By Judith Friedlander
Palgrave Macmillan

When Being Indian in Hueyapan came out in 1975, it challenged commonly held ideas about culture and identity in indigenous Mexico, raising questions that remain as provocative today as they were over thirty years ago. Now in this revised and updated edition, Judith Friedlander places her widely acclaimed work in historical context. The book describes the lives of the inhabitants of an indigenous pueblo during the late 1960s and early 1970s and analyzes the ways that Indians like them have been discriminated against since early colonial times. After presenting the case as she saw it in 1975, Friedlander examines the relevance of her arguments for explaining the changes that have subsequently taken place over the intervening years, following the story into the twenty-first century, both locally in Hueyapan and nationally. Friedlander pays particular attention in a new final chapter to the role anthropologists have played in defining the so-called Indian problem and in finding solutions to it, most recently as advocates of indigenous rights. In the process, she takes a critical look at current debates about identity politics and the meaning of multiculturalism.
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Being Indian in Hueyapan: A Revised and Updated Edition Being Indian in Hueyapan: A Revised and Updated Edition

Cuba Represent! Cuban Arts, State Power, and the Making of New Revolutionary Cultures
By Sujatha Fernandes
Duke University Press

Combining textual analyses of films, rap songs, and visual artworks; ethnographic material collected in Cuba; and insights into the nation’s history and political economy, Fernandes details the new forms of engagement with official institutions that have opened up as a result of changing relationships between state and society in the post-Soviet period. She demonstrates that in a moment of extreme hardship and uncertainty, the Cuban state has moved to a more permeable model of power. Artists and other members of the public are collaborating with government actors to partially incorporate critical cultural expressions into official discourse. The Cuban leadership has come to recognize the benefits of supporting artists: rappers offer a link to increasingly frustrated black youth in Cuba; visual artists are an important source of international prestige and hard currency; and films help unify Cubans through community discourse about the nation. Cuba Represent! reveals that part of the socialist government’s resilience stems from its ability to absorb oppositional ideas and values.
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Cuba Represent!: Cuban Arts, State Power, and the Making of New Revolutionary Cultures Cuba Represent! Cuban Arts, State Power, and the Making of New Revolutionary Cultures

Purchases using the above links benefit NACLA. Bookstores can bulk order NACLA books directly for classroom use. Contact us for more information.