NACLA Events: Reform Without Justice and Adiós Niño

 

Upcoming Events

Book Launch—Reform Without Justice: Latino Migrant Politics and the Homeland Security State
 
Wednesday, December 4, 2013 
Floor 4, 20 Cooper Square
New York, NY. 10003

Join NACLA’s editorial committee member Alfonso Gonzales for a book launch reception and panel discussion on Latino immigration, hosted by NACLA, the Latino Studies Program, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU.

Placed within the context of the past decade's war on terror and emergent Latino migrant movement, Reform without Justice addresses the issue of state violence against migrants in the United States. It questions what forces are driving draconian migration control policies and why it is that, despite its success in mobilizing millions, the Latino migrant movement and its allies have not been able to more successfully defend the rights of migrants.

PANELISTS:
Cristina Beltran, Author of The Trouble with Unity & Professor at NYU, Latino Studies
Juan Gonzalez, Journalist and Author of Harvest of Empire
David Brotherton, Author of numerous books and Professor at John Jay College, Department of Sociology
Monica Nova, Human Rights Advocate and Consultant with Families for Freedom 
 
The event is free and open to the public. Photo ID required to enter building.
Click here for more information.

 

The Gangs of Guatemala and the Politics of Death: Writing the Back Story of the Present
Public Lecture by Deborah Levenson
 
Monday, December 9, 2013
New York University: King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center Auditorium

53 Washington Square South, New York, NY (
map)

This public lecture draws from Prof. Levenson's latest book Adiós Niño: The Gangs of Guatemala City and the Politics of Death (Duke U Press, 2013), which "examines transformations in the Guatemalan gangs called Maras from their emergence in the 1980s to the early 2000s. A historical study, Adiós Niño describes how fragile spaces of friendship and exploration turned into rigid and violent ones in which youth, and especially young men, came to employ death as a natural way of living for the short period that they expected to survive. 

Click here for more information.


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