Interviews

May 21, 2012

In his new book, "Revolutionary Doctors: How Venezuela and Cuba Are Changing the World’s Conception of Health Care," author Steve Brouwer highlights the revolutionary health care practiced by Venezuela and Cuba. In this interview, Brouwer describes his new book and explains how these experiences are a road map to "a new kind of society."

January 30, 2012

A few days ago, I had a wide-ranging talk with Javier Sicilia, the founder of the Movement for Peace With Justice and Dignity. Since its inception last March, following the murder of Sicilia’s son, the group has campaigned against the spreading violence in Mexico, and more specifically against the militarization of Mexico’s Drug War and what Sicilia sees as the concurrent militarization of Mexican society. 

December 19, 2011

In Patricio Guzmán's latest film, the Chilean filmmaker points his camera toward Chile's Atacama desert, where several groups intertwine in a search for the past. In this NACLA video interview, Guzmán speaks about his new movie, nostalgia, Chile, the Latin American "pink tide," filmmaking, and the need for an audio-visual revolution.

November 15, 2011

In the early morning of November 15, Occupy Wall Street was raided by the New York City Police Department and occupiers were evicted from Zuccotti Park. Nevertheless, says OWS en Español member Eudes Payano in this interview with NACLA, "the movement will continue and it will be even stronger."

September 12, 2011

Beto, a 16-year-old hit man for La Familia Michoacana, one of the most notoriously violent Mexican drug gangs, tells his story. This article was originally published in the May/June 2011 issue of the NACLA Report on the Americas.

August 24, 2011

The following is an interview with Carlos Amaya, son of the renowned Honduran novelist, Ramón Amaya Amador, and a grassroots activist in the Honduran National Front of Popular Resistance (FNRP). He speaks on the past, present, and future of the Honduran resistance.

July 22, 2011

On July 26, 1953 Fidel Castro led an assault on the Moncada Barracks in Cuba, launching a popular movement that would topple the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista in 1959. This week, NACLA spoke with Ike Nahem, one of the coordinators of the July 26 Coalition, to discuss the significance of the anniversary, and its relevance to American activists in the United States.

July 21, 2011

In the most recent issue of NACLA, anthropologist Howard Campbell examines how Ciudad Juárez became the world’s most violent city after Mexican President Felipe Calderón deployed thousands of soldiers and federal police to fight the cartels. Campbell, a professor at the University of Texas-El Paso spoke with NACLA to further explain the political, social, and economic forces that led to this hyper-violence in Mexico.

July 20, 2011

On July 20, a caravan of over 100 people crossed the U.S.-Mexican border, carrying 100 tons of humanitarian aid on its way to Cuba. This is the 22nd aid caravan to Cuba organized by the interreligious organization Pastors for Peace, which brings humanitarian aid to Cuba each year in defiance of the U.S. economic embargo and travel ban.

July 12, 2011

“The roots of the War on Drugs go deep in Mexico. In fact, in some ways, they are deeper there than in the United States,” explains historian Isaac Campos in the most recent issue of NACLA. In order to better understand the forces behind drug prohibition in Mexico, NACLA spoke with Campos, who discussed the recent NACLA article, his forthcoming book, and his experience covering marijuana, prohibition, and drug culture in Mexico and the United States.

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