After Recognition: Indigenous Peoples Confront Capitalism

This issue of the NACLA Report explores the contributions and creative possibilities of indigenous movements at a moment when indigenous politics has moved beyond requests for state recognition and inclusion. In this period “after recognition,” indigenous activists, organizations and communities are challenging both the claims that liberal national states exert over indigenous resources and territories, and the misplaced social and economic priorities of neoliberal capitalism.

Title:
After Recognition: Indigenous Peoples Confront Capitalism, print edition
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Taking Note

Intro

NACLA
This issue of the NACLA Report explores the contributions and creative possibilities of indigenous movements at a moment when indigenous politics has moved beyond requests for state recognition and inclusion. In this period “after recognition,” indigenous activists, organizations and communities are challenging both the claims that liberal national states exert over indigenous resources and territories, and the misplaced social and economic priorities of neoliberal capitalism.

Updates

Jeremy Bigwood
The U.S. State Department is secretly funneling millions of dollars to Latin American journalists, according to documents obtained in June under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Report

Sara Diamond and Christian Poirier
The world’s third-largest hydroelectric dam, in the Xingu River Basin in Brazil’s Amazonian rainforest, will wreak incalculable social and environmental damage.
Mario A. Murillo
Two years after a major national mobilization, the Colombian indigenous movement faces it biggest challenge since perhaps the 1970s.
Deborah Poole and Gerardo Rénique
María Teresa Sierra
An indigenous police and justice system outside the state has achieved widespread legitimacy and drastically reduced violence and crime.
Bill Weinberg
Local indigenous leadership in Bolivia took the opportunity in April to challenge the government on its commitment to extractive industry.

Reviews

Lynn Stephen
Maria’s Story: A Documentary Portrait of Love and Survival in El Salvador’s Civil War, a documentary film by Monona Wali and Pamela Cohen (1990, re-released 2010), DVD, PM Press, 60 mins.
NACLA
Violence and Activism at the Border: Gender, Fear, and Everyday Life in Ciudad Juárez by Kathleen Stuart (University of Texas Press, 2008); The Wind Doesn’t Need a Passport: Stories From the U.S.- Mexico Borderland, by Tychy Hendricks (University of California Press, 2010); Impacts of Border Enforcement on Mexican Migration, Wayne Cornelius and Jessa M. Lewis, eds. (Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, 2007).

MALA

Kevin Young
U.S. corporate media have taken aim at Latin American economic policies that diverge from Washington’s neoliberal prescriptions—despite those prescriptions’ contribution to the financial crisis.