Reviews

February 3, 2023
John Dinges

Jim Popkin’s Code Name Blue Wren recounts the astounding story of Defense Intelligence Agency mole Ana Montes, told by a veteran investigative reporter.

January 13, 2023
Caio Fernandes Barbosa

Rodrigo Lopes de Barros’ book serves as a guide for the Brazilian underground youth movements around the turn of the century, both in their political and cultural dimensions.

January 9, 2023
Lorgia García-Peña

Erased from the archive, the remarkable story of one Afro-Dominican revolutionary illuminates the Dominican colonial desire for whiteness at the expense of Black women’s lives.

January 6, 2023
Alexander Liebman

Laura Mora’s new film depicting five boys on a journey to claim a small piece of land severs the violent myths governing heterosexuality in Colombian society, crafting potent worlds of queer possibility, care, and liberation in the face of violence and dispossession.

December 23, 2022
Hilary Goodfriend

Elizabeth O’Donnell Gandolfo and Laurel Marshal Potter’s new book provides a moving portrait of the liberatory praxis of El Salvador’s popular church, but its engagement with decolonial theory falls short.

December 16, 2022
Gene Morales

Mike Amezcua’s book examines how Mexicans skillfully crafted communities and endured in Chicago amid segregation, displacement, immigration policy, and gentrification in the 20th century.

October 21, 2022
Paula Halperin

Darlene J. Sadlier’s monumental history of feature and short documentary film documents Brazil’s unique contribution to the genre while mapping a biography of the nation.

September 23, 2022
Irene Brisson

As daily life in Haiti goes on, evictions, displacement, and other experiences of urban space powerfully shape exclusion and belonging.

August 26, 2022
Caio Fernandes Barbosa

Anadelia A. Romo’s book analyzes the visual and symbolic reinvention of Salvador, exposing how tourism, the arts, and the elite emphasized Blackness as a unique element of Bahian identity for profit.

August 12, 2022
Daniel Rey

Historian Peter J. Watson's first book examines how former Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos used sports to garner support for his peace process with the FARC. 

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