Interview: El Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos

Forty years ago this month, a military junta staged a coup in Chile. September 11th 1973 was the first day of a violent dictatorship that would last until 1990. Its aftermath has left a scar on Chilean society. The Museo de Memoria y Derechos Humanos in Santiago, Chile was inaugurated in 2010 to commemorate the tens of thousands of Chileans who were disappeared, tortured, or killed. In this space, Chileans look at photos, hear testimony, and watch video footage of the military coup and its lasting legacy.

Alexandra Hall

Forty years ago this month, a military junta staged a coup in Chile. September 11th 1973 was the first day of a violent dictatorship that would last until 1990. Its aftermath has left a scar on Chilean society.

1984

This September, NACLA's Alexandra Hall visited the Museo de Memoria y Derechos Humanos in Santiago, Chile. It was inaugurated in 2010 to commemorate the tens of thousands of Chileans who were disappeared, tortured, or killed. In this space, Chileans look at photos, hear testimony, and watch video footage of the military coup and its lasting legacy.

Outside, an ex political prisoner Luis Rojas Muñoz was visiting the museum with his wife Gabriela, and their teenage daughter Catalina.

Hall asked Luis and his family, "How did the dictatorship change chilean society?"

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