Columns

September 11, 2013
To contain Colombia´s  spreading rural crisis, the government of Juan Manuel Santos, facing peasant strikers who have blocked several crucial highways, has followed a three-pronged strategy of co-optation, coercion (some of it violent) and a surface re-shuffling of government officials. Up to this point, nothing has worked as the strike enters its fourth week.
September 10, 2013
The coup d'etat by General Augusto Pinochet in Chile on September 11, 1973 transformed the history of socialism. Almost a thousand days before, Salvador Allende and the Popular Unity coalition had taken office promising a “Chilean Road to Socialism” based on democratic principles. The Chilean path towards socialism has been an important example and a warning to left leaning political and social movements for the past 40 years in Latin America.
September 8, 2013
Since the death of Hugo Chávez in March of 2013, new Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and his government have received critiques from its traditional opposition and from new critics as well.
September 5, 2013
Against the wishes of the prevailing drug control regime, last month the government of Uruguay took the first steps to legalize marijuana. Against the backdrop of the failed War on Drugs, it is about time that the countries of the Caribbean come forward with their own individual policies on marijuana which reflects their own national security and development interests—instead of those of the United States.
September 4, 2013
On August 25, 2013 a cargo train derailed in southern Mexico killing 11 Central American migrants who were hitching a ride on top of the freight cars. At least 250 Central Americans were estimated to have been riding on the train before it derailed, injuring another 18 migrants.
August 28, 2013
Last week it was announced that the U.S. State Department had suspended aid to St. Lucia’s police department due to allegations of serious human rights abuses.  It has also had the unintended result of exposing the double standard of the U.S. when it comes to problems of police engaging in extrajudicial killings throughout the region.
August 28, 2013
Happily ever after is not always so simple for foreigners in the United States with complicated immigration histories who marry U.S. citizens. The details like how they arrived in the United States or how long they've been there can mean the difference between starting a life with their new family and immigration laws not allowing them to stay.
August 27, 2013
Recent events in Bolivia have reignited continuing tensions over the proposed TIPNIS highway, as indigenous leaders face serious criminal charges and the Morales government has confirmed that undercover police agents infiltrated the landmark 2011 anti-highway mobilization.
August 27, 2013
The government of Colombia has been forced to negotiate with peasants' organizations in the wake of the peasants' strong show of force. The rural workers who have mounted Colombia's national agrarian strike are staying the course after four peasants and one policeman were killed and scores more detained. Hundred of thousands of peasants and small farmers are participating in this historic mobilization whose scope and magnitude have not been seen for decades.
August 21, 2013
According to Michael Evans, Director of the Colombia Project at the National Security Archives, "This may well be the most important collection of records ever assembled on corporate ties to terrorism.  This was a massive, years-long investigation that involved multiple federal agencies and resulted in the one of the first convictions of a major US company of financing a terrorist group.”
August 21, 2013
On the morning of July 17 a fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles swooped down on Congresswoman Candice Miller’s office in Macomb County, Michigan.  Eighteen inches long and made of cardboard, these mini-drones were part of a larger protest.  Supplementing the barely-hidden racial anxieties driving much of contemporary U.S. immigration policy, the inclusion of the northern border as an enforcement priority is grounded in a post-9/11 logic of pre-emptive surveillance and "security" at all costs.
August 20, 2013
Al Jazeera America boasts a new, advertiser-revenue-driven dynamic; it has taken compromising stances in its courtship of U.S. cable distributors; its recruitment of management and on-air personnel demonstrates conservatism; and it has paid for close consultation with lobbying firms with deep rightwing ties. All of these factors threaten to guide it toward the most insipid and insular tendencies of U.S. cable news.
August 19, 2013
Today Monday, August 19, Colombia is witnessing a general rural strike involving most of its population—a strike revealing the deep crisis of the rentier-economic model.
August 15, 2013
The fallout from the suspicious death of Judge Jean Serge Joseph on July 13 has created a political firestorm for Haitian President Michel Martelly – the likes of which he has not seen during his tumultuous rule. A recently released Senate report calls for Martelly to be charged with high treason for his role in interfering with a high profile corruption case.
August 14, 2013
The saga of Edward Snowden and the “hijacking” of Evo Morales’s presidential jet continues to reverberate in Bolivia, where it has reignited a controversy over Brazil’s grant of political asylum to rightwing politician Roger Pinto.
August 12, 2013
The on-going peace talks in Havana between the rebels and the government are deadlocked.
August 8, 2013
As part of the NACLA-Global Voices series, Latin America: Migrant Journeys, we talk to Global Voices contributor Robert Valencia and NACLA writer Joseph Nevins about what the U.S. immigration reform legislation means for migrant communities.
August 8, 2013
At the 34th meeting of the Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) on July 6, a British human rights law firm has been contacted by CARICOM to to seek compensation from some European countries for the horrors of African slavery and the genocide of the region’s native peoples.
August 7, 2013
The Dream 9 remain in detention, but to continue to fight against detention, deportation, and the division of families and communities, demonstrating the way forward for all of us.
August 2, 2013
On July 13, Judge Jean Serge Joseph passed away under suspicious circumstances, sparking controversy within Haiti that his death was related to his involvement in a high-profile corruption investigation against President Michel Martelly’s wife Sophia and their son Olivier.
August 1, 2013
A tribute to Ben Kohl, Latin American scholar, activist, and NACLA contributor, by his colleagues.
July 30, 2013
In the second part of this interview, Mexican journalist and author Eileen Truax offers her insights on the immigration bill that the U.S. Senate recently passed, and she explains why “the DREAMers” offer an example of the contributions of immigrants to the United States.
July 28, 2013
In its treatments of Guatemalan and Honduran violence and instability, NPR's This American Life edited out essential lines of inquiry and concealed the countries' relevance for U.S. listeners: It is as if Washington’s continuous support of the Central American countries' brutal security forces had never happened.
July 26, 2013
In an interview, Mexican journalist and author Eileen Truax offers her insights on the immigration bill that the U.S. Senate recently passed, and she explains why “the DREAMers” offer an example of the contributions of immigrants to the United States.
July 25, 2013
On July 22, Ontario Superior Court Justice Carole Brown ruled in a landmark decision that lawsuits against the Canadian mining company Hudbay Minerals regarding shootings, murder, and rapes at its former mine in El Estor, Guatemala can proceed to trial in Canada.

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