United States

November 19, 2021
Daniel Rey

Ada Ferrer’s latest book is a nuanced study tracing the importance of slavery to U.S.–Cuba relations from American independence through the Civil War.

October 14, 2021
Jaime Scott and Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera

The story of two Cubans through Central America illustrates the hardships migrants face trying to reach the United States.

August 3, 2021
Christian Pettersen

The Biden administration remains focused on economic development in Guatemala that will raise GDP, without disrupting the global economics that have contributed to inequality.

September 19, 2019
Melanie La Rosa

Citizen-led solar initiatives in Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria remedied immediate local challenges and forged increased resilience using sustainable power, serving as an important example in clean energy development.

August 15, 2018
Laura Blume

U.S. responses to Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega and Honduras’ Juan Orlando Hernández reveal Washington’s foreign policy in Central America is stuck in the Cold War era.

September 26, 2017
Marisol LeBrón

How reconsidering the history of policing in Puerto Rico complicates our understandings of the island's colonial relationship with the United States

March 10, 2014
There’s nothing new about drones flying over Mexican airspace without congressional approval. But Peña Nieto is challenging the most traditional—and also progressive—practices of sovereignty and national development in Mexico.
November 29, 2013
By 2008, one in ten Mexicans, some 11.4 million people, resided in the United States. However, the global financial crisis, combined with the increased militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border and the numerous costs and perils associated with emigrating to the United States from Mexico and Central America, have dissuaded increasing numbers from taking the risk. 
November 21, 2013
It is becoming increasingly difficult for Mexican officials to pretend that the massive number of murders and enforced disappearances is not part of a deliberate government strategy. Political rhetoric, unsurprisingly, points to drug cartels as the sole perpetrators of violent crime in Mexico. But the mantra that the Mexican state, supported with funds and military wherewithal by the U.S. government, is waging a genuine war on organized crime is a pervasive but totally false myth.
May 29, 2012
On May 3, World Press Freedom Day, the U.S. government condemned a litany of countries for the dangerous conditions in which journalists work. But Honduras was noticeably excluded from any official scrutiny. It seems safe to conclude that World Press Freedom Day is little more than a parade of double standards set by the United States, with media outlets serving as willing abettors.

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