Articles by: NACLA

December 29, 2011

We are pleased to announce that NACLA has launched its first NACLA Radio Podcast. Featuring content on the U.S.-Mexico Border, Bolivia, Chile, Venezuela, and much more.

December 21, 2011

NACLA’s latest Report on the Americas is now available. This issue, "Latino Student Movements: Defending Education," gives voice to Latino student movements across the Americas that are standing up to the crises, cutbacks, and repression.

December 12, 2011
October 19, 2011
September 10, 2011

This Sunday marks the 10th anniversary of the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center. But it is also the 38th anniversary of Augusto Pinochet's bloody coup d’état against the democratically-elected Chilean president Salvador Allende. In commemoration of September 11, we have pulled from the NACLA archives. The following is the introduction to the October 1973 NACLA Report, written only days after the Pinochet coup and entitled, “Chile: The Story Behind the Coup.”

August 18, 2011

The North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA) seeks a full-time Co-Editor to produce our bimonthly magazine on Latin American politics and U.S. relations with the region, NACLA Report on the Americas. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in magazine journalism as well as Latin American studies.

August 16, 2011
July 22, 2011

On July 26, 1953 Fidel Castro led an assault on the Moncada Barracks in Cuba, launching a popular movement that would topple the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista in 1959. This week, NACLA spoke with Ike Nahem, one of the coordinators of the July 26 Coalition, to discuss the significance of the anniversary, and its relevance to American activists in the United States.

July 21, 2011

In the most recent issue of NACLA, anthropologist Howard Campbell examines how Ciudad Juárez became the world’s most violent city after Mexican President Felipe Calderón deployed thousands of soldiers and federal police to fight the cartels. Campbell, a professor at the University of Texas-El Paso spoke with NACLA to further explain the political, social, and economic forces that led to this hyper-violence in Mexico.

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