Argentina

October 5, 2015
Robert Soutar

Climate and environment overlooked in presidential race as economic concerns top electorate’s agenda

April 28, 2015
Sebastian Muñoz-Najar Galvez

Exposing the corruption behind an Argentine soccer team's downfall. 

April 6, 2015
Aldo Caliari

Allowing a U.S. court ruling to determine the process for international debt repayments sets a dangerous precedent, and exposes gray areas in international legal jurisdiction.

November 18, 2014
Charles Dolph

Argentina’s debt dispute with U.S. holdout creditors sparked a global conversation on debt restructuring, and may determine the fate of Kirchnerism at home.

August 14, 2014
Dan Beeton

When a billionaire can hold a country hostage, debt “default” takes on new meaning.

March 29, 2014
On the anniversary of Argentina's 1976 coup d’état, HIJOS founding member Camilo Juárez describes his organization's continued work to bring justice to the victims of the seven-year military dictatorship.
January 28, 2014
When Argentina’s Supreme Court upheld in October a media law that takes on press monopolies while promoting diversity in media ownership, journalists in the English-speaking North covered it as a blow to press freedom.
December 6, 2013
Argentina's nationalization of YPF took a strange turn this year when the government signed a deal with Chevron to boost gas extraction through fracking. President Fernández and her team say this will lead the country to "energy sovereignty."  But what does energy sovereignty mean and what does fracking mean for popular democracy and real economic transformation?
November 18, 2013
Extractives in Latin America aspires to draw attention to reality as represented through Latin American eyes and voices. The politics we explore here may run the gamut from getting access to a canister of propane to cook dinner in Bolivia to the paradoxes linking Argentine nationalism, Chevron, and the U.S.-backed fracking push in the hemisphere.
July 22, 2013
Kevin Young
Despite the recent substantial coverage of Latin American “dirty wars” of the 1960s through 1980s, U.S. news outlets have usually ignored the role of the U.S. government in supporting these murderous right-wing regimes through military aid and diplomatic support. This pattern also applies to press coverage of current U.S.-backed “dirty wars,” in Honduras and elsewhere.
 

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